QuickType Like You’ve Had a Few

One of the least heralded features of iOS 8 is QuickType, often known as “Auto-Complete”. Instead of rudely correcting your misspellings like Auto Correct, QuickType suggests three possibilities for what you might want to type next: the more keys you press, the more precise the suggestion. On rare occasions, it doesn’t suggest what you want to type and you must type the entire word. But a more common occurrence is that you get the next word you were going to type with one or two key presses. While you could probably type the word faster than reviewing and accepting the appropriate suggestion, QuickType saves a significant amount of screen-tapping.

Somewhere in between those two situations is when you can just accept the first suggestion without any input. The results can be amusing. Although sentences composed this way appear grammatically correct, they are semantically nonsensical. When the featured debuted last fall, the world saw a Twitter account of these amusing missives and even a song composed using only QuickType.

Last night, a friend and I wrote to each other using only QuickType suggestions. It made no sense but was amusing nonetheless.

She began:

The fact that the company said the government of national security and stability in the world is full of people who are not in a row

Look at the end of the best thing

To which I replied:

The fact I can get it right away with the best of the year and I don’t think that I have a great way of the year.

To which she replied:

Thanks to my mom
I love the new version of a sudden urge
I’m at a time when you are so

To which I replied:

I’m at a time when you are not

To which she replied:

The fact I can see it

The only thing that would have to go back and I don’t think that I have a great way of the day

And I then wrote:

No more. I’m at a time when you are not in my room for a long way in hell

I have no idea how I feel so good

And she concluded:

Ok so I have a good idea but I can’t even get the hang of the year

You really have to appreciate the things computers say. Reads like we had a few, doesn’t it?

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